Upgrade

Welcome to Considered Haste, version 2 of simonwoods.net.

Let’s start with the changes:

  • Theme
    • Switched from a lighter theme to a darker theme.
      • Includes a new color palette.
    • Icon
      • The site’s first icon, for bookmarks and your tabs.
    • Time
      • Removed ‘estimated reading time’ detail by posts.
  • JSON
    • The site can now be read via JSON feeds.
  • Taxonomy
    • Categories merged into tags.
    • Added a new tag, update, for shorter news-style posts.
  • Streamlined
    • Removed clutter from the front page.
    • Especially at the bottom of the site.
  • Pages
    • Updated About, Now, and Feeds.
    • Added v1.
  • IndieWeb
    • Added plugins to support the following:
      • webmentions
      • semantic linkbacks
      • IndieAuth
      • rel=me

 

I’ve been quite pleased with the launch of this site, from November to now, specifically in its role as the stable presence of my online identity. Owning my identity via my own domain and investigating the IndieWeb has been a huge relief to the idea of depending on the big social media sites and the Closed Web, thanks in no small part to my account on Micro.blog. I recently settled my hosted blog on there as separate from this site but it is no less mine; Manton Reece and co. are quite insistent on avoiding simply replacing the Closed Web with another closed environment and I couldn’t be more grateful for their work.

This was my plan all along, although the recent stretch of inactivity on this site was unexpected (fortunately it was thanks to good news) but Micro.blog has provided an antidote to the hole of stress that is moving, having become a respite and source of inspiration for the past two months. As such, it remains as my personal blog and social feed, and regular activity continues over there.

I have more to come with this site, especially writing, and progress reports on new projects all of which are at least well into the planning stage; I am excited by each one and looking forward to rolling them out. In the meantime I am making sure the aforementioned changes have settled well, specifically those centred around IndieWeb improvements.

I’d like to thank a few people:

 

That’s all for now. Bye!

We do want Blogging to be as Easy and Simple as Tweeting

Now imagine all of the fake news, trolling, and negativity amplified a 100 times.

Rajiv Abraham doesn’t want to see the toxicity of the Closed Web spill into the Open Web.

 

This is a valid concern and should certainly be on the mind of both the community as a whole and those who make the software upon which blogging lives.

However, the Open Web and especially the blog-based sections of it already have years of experience in dealing with these problems; a good example is the aforementioned Micro.blog, as an alternative to a commenting system is quite brilliant in its elegance — now as individuals we do not have to manage the comments on our site, whilst those who are either writing for a site in a group or employed to do so can either choose to manage the comments or not… or even better, turn to something like Micro.blog where the comments are a lot less likely to be poisonous from the get-go.

Of course this is also dependent on the development of platforms like Micro.blog; it could go either way. The point here is that we all know more now than we ever did and it is upon those of us who care to actually go to the effort to have community standards, including codes of conduct and active moderating where it is needed.

There is no doubt that the vitriol from which the big Closed Web media companies have been profiting is a different kind of beast from what we once so naively referred to as “Internet Drama”, and we should be vigilant lest it spreads entirely across the web but we have hope like never before be it from the experienced crowd of web users, the bright new minds of so-called digital natives, or those of us who have adapted to the ever growing blend of physical and digital. We are determined to not so easily lose this world before it has barely begun, certainly not to the likes of those who clearly care not for the people who have built their success whether that’s Mark or Jack, and most certainly not to the people who use their work to wreak havoc in our lives.

We can do better. And I think we will.

Closed Means Closed

Ed Cormany recently shared a link to a step-by-step tutorial for the Apple-owned Workflow app.

Not only was Ed interested in the existence of such tutorials at all but when I saw what the specific editorial was about I perked up; as a (happy) Apple Music subscriber I would definitely be interested in learning how to get quicker access, especially if the instructions are written out in what is likely an easily consumable manner.

Well, I can only assume.

Federico Viticci recently shared a link to a tip for the Apple-owned Workflow app.

Federico, like Ed, was interested — enthused even — to see such information being produced by Apple. It is in fact for the same thing and so, again, I thought this was good only this time I was hesitant to put much more effort into investigating.

You see, this editorial is only available to read in the App Store app on iOS. Whilst it’s enough of a shame to see such interesting and potentially valuable information locked behind such a closed door, it was also interesting to me to see that it was shared in both cases behind another closed door: Twitter. Whilst Federico owns and writes for the excellent Macstories, there might not be much that can be realistically done to stop Apple — or anybody else — from hiding such excellent writing and help away within their own closed spaces. Meanwhile Twitter continues to be the deeply flawed vessel through which this information is carried and given to… some people who would find it useful.

Yet another sign of just how limiting and limited the modern web is.