Closed Means Closed

Ed Cormany recently shared a link to a step-by-step tutorial for the Apple-owned Workflow app.

Not only was Ed interested in the existence of such tutorials at all but when I saw what the specific editorial was about I perked up; as a (happy) Apple Music subscriber I would definitely be interested in learning how to get quicker access, especially if the instructions are written out in what is likely an easily consumable manner.

Well, I can only assume.

Federico Viticci recently shared a link to a tip for the Apple-owned Workflow app.

Federico, like Ed, was interested — enthused even — to see such information being produced by Apple. It is in fact for the same thing and so, again, I thought this was good only this time I was hesitant to put much more effort into investigating.

You see, this editorial is only available to read in the App Store app on iOS. Whilst it’s enough of a shame to see such interesting and potentially valuable information locked behind such a closed door, it was also interesting to me to see that it was shared in both cases behind another closed door: Twitter. Whilst Federico owns and writes for the excellent Macstories, there might not be much that can be realistically done to stop Apple — or anybody else — from hiding such excellent writing and help away within their own closed spaces. Meanwhile Twitter continues to be the deeply flawed vessel through which this information is carried and given to… some people who would find it useful.

Yet another sign of just how limiting and limited the modern web is.

Taking Writer Offline

(Note: This was originally written on the 31st of January, 2017.)

 

Today I took Writer into Offline Mode for the first time. It worked out well.

 

This is in fact the first thing I have written in Writer whilst offline, or at least the first time in which I did not have access to the internet by necessity rather than choice. If that doesn’t speak to how lazy my current decision making for subjects is then nothing ever will.

Either way, here I am without even the ability to become distracted by such delights as social media or email or… well, just about anything. It is odd to say the least but I am definitely enjoying it; this makes me think that it is therefore perhaps time to use software to restrict my access to such distractions — there is certainly not shortage of options for that.

On previous occasions I have been relieved to have purchased the lifetime version of Writer and today is no different; in fact, it is a lifesaver. To have a reliable text editor with such flexibility as to be at home both offline and online has given me a direct line to feeling altogether less useless during this day. For better context, let’s talk about the computer I am using.

The Chromebook I am currently using is the first small laptop I have ever used of the modern generation; it leaves the short-lived “netbook” category from a decade ago looking like the cheap con that it undoubtedly was, such is the quality I find throughout. Even the browser-based OS outshines the so-called desktop-class machines in a shameful spot.

With all of that in mind, it’s fair to say that it is down to the software to do most of the talking with this machine; the hardware is little more than a thin case through which you interact with the apps built for Google’s own OS. From this point, Writer shines, delivering me everything I need for what I am doing right now whilst not getting in my way; it might be seem like an obvious required function for a text editor but when you consider that Writer is primarily *made for a browser*, the app’s robust performance is startling for those of us with longer memories.

Despite my meandering into the realm of notebooks, Chromebooks, and my old age the fact remains that Writer has done exactly what I need, when I need, and I could not be happier as a lifetime customer.

 

Thanks John Watson, like a man in a blue box you’ve given me time where none existed before.

 

Links: Writer, John Watson, Chromebooks

IndieWeb progress

By IndieWeb I mean in an informal way as a general idea, since I’m not yet au fait with official standards.

This is my personal progress:

  • This site is up and running with regular posts.
  • Twitter account is archived, pending deletion depending on how Jack and co. decide to tackle obvious problems.
  • Only other social profiles are Apple Music, Vimeo, and YouTube.
    • Last one remains because Google have well and truly destroyed open web video with this monopoly.
  • Micro.blog is now my regular haunt for commenting, social web things.
  • Using RSS to read more than I ever have.
    • Actively working on my preferred set-up for this, which is work on my web tools that I am actually enjoying!
  • Signed up to Pinboard.
  • Maintained my Fastmail account.
  • Setting aside time for focused research on managing my own site from the server level.
    • WP-hosted is okay but I need to decide if I have enough time and energy to do my own thing as opposed to spending money for similar results. Right now I favour the latter, mostly because I just want to write.